Last edited by Gardaran
Wednesday, July 22, 2020 | History

4 edition of Manuscripts and readers in fifteenth-century England found in the catalog.

Manuscripts and readers in fifteenth-century England

Manuscripts and readers in fifteenth-century England

the literary implications of manuscript study : essays from the 1981 conference at the University of York

  • 18 Want to read
  • 31 Currently reading

Published by D.S. Brewer, Biblio Distribution Services in Cambridge, Totowa, NJ .
Written in English

    Places:
  • England
    • Subjects:
    • English literature -- Middle English, 1100-1500 -- Criticism, Textual -- Congresses.,
    • English literature -- Middle English, 1100-1500 -- Manuscripts -- Congresses.,
    • Manuscripts, English (Middle) -- Editing -- Congresses.,
    • Manuscripts, Medieval -- England -- Editing -- Congresses.,
    • Books and reading -- England -- History -- Congresses.,
    • Paleography, English -- Congresses.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references.

      Statementedited by Derek Pearsall.
      ContributionsPearsall, Derek Albert.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsPR275.T45 M35 1983
      The Physical Object
      Pagination146 p. :
      Number of Pages146
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL3167198M
      ISBN 100859911489
      LC Control Number83009223

      In this article, Daniel Wakelin considers the annotations provided by scribes in fifteenth-century manuscripts of English poetry, asking what sort of reading these annotations prescribe and Author: Daniel Wakelin. This series aims to further the study of manuscripts from the middle ages to the Renaissance. It will include books devoted to particular types of manuscript, their production and circulation, to individual codices of outstanding importance, and to regions, periods and scripts of especial interest to scholars.

        Jonathan J.G. Alexander, 'Two English Fifteenth-Century Manuscripts in the Biblioteca Estense with Illumination Attributable to the 'Caesar Master''; Linda L. Brownrigg, 'Bibliography of Kathleen L. Scott'; Christopher de Hamel, 'The Baldry Pattern Book'; Lynda Dennison, 'Penwork Decoration and its Significance in English Manuscripts of the Fourteenth Century'; A.I. Doyle, 'Pen Pages:   Fifteenth-century English libraries and private collections have long been known to contain manuscripts in French. Studies of these French manuscripts have often emphasized contemporary acts of translation into English. Instead, this talk draws on manuscripts from the Bodleian’s collections, as well as medieval references to French books, in order to investigate how English .

      Two Fifteenth Century Cookery Books Faulke Watling (ed.), Thomas Austin (ed.) Oxford University Press ISBN: Available from: Publisher's Notes: This is an EXACT reproduction of a book published before This IS NOT an OCR'd book with strange characters, introduced typographical errors, and jumbled words. UK Bars Export of Fifteenth-Century Manuscript Guide for Hermits. By Rebecca Rego “This beautiful decorated manuscript is a precious record of the life of hermits in 15th century England and it would be a sad loss if it was sold abroad,” commented Whately in a press release. Like many of the books and manuscripts in that sale, this.


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Manuscripts and readers in fifteenth-century England Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Manuscripts and readers in fifteenth century England: the literary implications of manuscript study: essays from the conference at the University of York. [Derek Albert Pearsall;]. Get this from a library. Manuscripts and readers in fifteenth-century England: the literary implications of manuscript study: essays from the conference at the University of York.

[Derek Pearsall;]. : Manuscripts and Readers in Fifteenth-Century England: The Literary Implications of Manuscript Study: Essays from the Conference at the. The Hardcover of the Manuscripts and Readers in Fifteenth-Century England: The Literary Implications of Manuscript Study Essays from the Conference at the B&N Outlet Membership Educators Gift Cards Stores & Events HelpAuthor: Derek Pearsall.

George R. Keiser, "Manuscripts and Readers in Fifteenth-Century England: The Literary Implications of Manuscript Study. Derek Pearsall," The Papers of the Bibliographical Society of Amer no. 2 (Second Quarter, ):   The book challenges recent efforts at associating complex miscellaneous manuscripts produced in fifteenth-century England with the English vernacular.

(24) In contrast to these Manuscripts and readers in fifteenth-century England book, the Sloane manuscript rebuffs the notion that, for this book's producers, there was a.

Traditional scholarship on manuscripts has tended to focus on issues concerning their production and has shown comparatively little interest in the cultural contexts of the manuscript book. The Medieval Manuscript Book redresses this by focusing on aspects of the medieval book in its cultural situations.4/5(1).

Free Online Library: The "gender gap" reconsidered: manuscripts and readers in late-medieval England (1). by "Studia Anglica Posnaniensia: international review of English Studies"; Literature, writing, book reviews Languages and linguistics English literature, (Middle English period) Criticism and interpretation Literacy History Middle English period, Sex role Sex roles.

ner of languages. 5 The notes sampled in this essay, then, do not represent fifteenth-century reading in England as a whole. Nevertheless, there are many notes by the fifteenth-century scribes of English poetry. Some provided notes appear in even earlier poetic manuscripts too.

6 But in the half century around the overall number of. Sixteenth-Century Readers, Fifteenth-Century Books by Margaret Connolly,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide.

In Praise of Scribes is a major contribution to the field of manuscript studies in the late sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. This profusely illustrated book argues for the significant role played by clerks and scriveners both in contemporary society and in the transmissional history of literary texts.

John Gower: Manuscripts, Readers, Contexts assess Gower’s literary output within the context of manuscript production and readership/ownership in late medieval England and the triangle of Latin, French, and English as literary and official languages in Ricardian England.

Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest. Fifteenth-Century Books in Print & Manuscript Paul Needham Will Noel The use of a wide variety of evidence—paper, parchment, type, script, rubrication and illumination, bindings, ownership marks, and annotations—can shed light both on questions of analytical bibliography and on wider questions of book distribution, provenance, and use.

The Book of Hours [see image below] was produced in the latter part of the fifteenth century, and was written in Latin and French in two stages in Southern Burgundy (or near Lyons) in manuscript has several interesting features which may hint at the identity of the original owner, including the unusual prominence of St Humbert (there is a full page miniature of the saint.

Manuscript culture uses manuscripts to store and disseminate information; in the West, it generally preceded the age of early manuscript culture, monks copied manuscripts by hand. They copied not just religious works, but a variety of texts including some on astronomy, herbals, and bestiaries.

Medieval manuscript culture deals with the transition of the manuscript from the. The resurgence of manuscript studies can be conveniently traced to the conference he hosted at the University of York and the resulting edited collection, Manuscripts and Author: Kevin Gustafson.

In the second half of the fifteenth century, the Loire region became the main residence of the French court and Tours took over the leading role in the production of luxury manuscripts. Related centres such as Bourges and Rouen are also represented by examples from the main artists.

Lawton, 'The Illustration of Late Medieval Secular Texts with Special Reference to Lydgate's 'Troy Book'', in Manuscripts and Readers in Fifteenth-Century England: The Literary Implications of Manuscript Study: Essays from the Conference at the University of York, ed.

by Derek Pearsall (Cambridge: Brewer, ), pp. (pp.Reading and War in Fifteenth-Century England: From Lydgate to Malory by Catherine Nall.

Andrew Lynch. This example sets up extended studies of Lydgate’s Troy Book and Siege of Thebes, Nall’s approach includes a detailed study of English ownership of Vegetius manuscripts in the fifteenth century. The Book of Hours [see image below] was produced in the latter part of the fifteenth century, and was written in Latin and French in two stages in Southern Burgundy (or near Lyons) in manuscript has several interesting features which may hint at the identity of the original owner, including the unusual prominence of St Humbert (there is a full page miniature of the saint.

Book Production in the Noble Household in Fifteenth-century England. By Margaret Connolly. Edition 1st Edition. First Published but the survival of some if his manuscripts has perpetuated these texts for future generations of readers.

Indeed, some of these poems are now only known through his by:   That the manuscripts above were sold second-hand can be determined from the handwriting: while the price tags date from the fifteenth century (Figs. 1 and 3) and the sixteenth century (Fig.

4), the books themselves were copied in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries (see the captions).The fifteenth century was also a period of intellectual stagnation in most men's houses. But the period also witnessed the building of new libraries and a renewal of activity on the part of librarians.

Monasteries, friaries, cathedrals and colleges were interested in the construction of new book-rooms and new by: